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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN 17
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
, michigan, florida, new hampshire, getting the vast majority of political events. of course in these last 48 hours, all of the candidates back in ohio and virginia. this programming note, we will have a final campaign rally by the president where he campaigned in iowa. we will have the final appearance in new hampshire of mitt romney tomorrow evening. of course, we are here live all day today as well. michigan, independent line. our question, who is going to win and why? caller: i think that president obama will win. good morning, steve. i think the president will win by a good margin. i have always been a conservative republican. you can see what the republican party has done to people like ron paul, and he was not even given a voice at the national convention. i think that the system is corrupt and people have no choice but to vote for obama. host: thank you for the call. this comment -- host: "the new york daily news," supporting barack obama in 2008, supporting mitt romney in their editorial. inside it says -- "our choice for the future." host: that is from "of the new york daily news" e
, virginia and ohio. they feel ok about florida and virginia. but a sign of trouble. jonathan martin is hearing the margins for him in chesterfield county just outside of richmond, where he is doing well, it is not good enough. if he's losing there, it's a sign of trouble in the state. in ohio, romney is worried about the midwest. wisconsin, and ohio, real nervousness. in the obama war room, confidence. exit polls looked good for john kerry. there are jokes about president kerry. but their models are coming in. the vote is coming in how they expected. >> one state declared is indiana, which obama won and it is called for romney. it shows the map is smaller this time, the map is smaller. some of the exit polling looks good, some does not, with what people think of health care and the role of government. people ask me, who should i vote for? what will they do? i have no clue. none of the candidates talked about what they'll do. it goes with what john wrote, about how small the campaign is in what is a huge moment. when you think of what is happening with our debt. trillion-dollar defic
and iowa and florida. how we won 332 votes is complicated. it is not just one thing. we will talk about what that means for politics going forward. one thing i learned is better not overlearn lessons that just happened because our country and our politics are changing so very, very rapidly. the important thing now the election is over, hopefully we will have a moment in washington where the lead 76ers will come together and the issues of fiscal policy, job creation and education and immigration and energy, that is no longer the looming issue of we have a re-election. that is done. barack obama has run his last campaign. you have a divided government. the one mandate the american people are sending is a mandate to work together which is focused on us. do not focus on what divides you as politicians, focus on us. i don't offer misplaced optimism often. when you are in washington you can get pessimistic really quick. but i think there is a pathway on immigration reform, a long-term debt reduction deal. continued education reform. that is really the test to the president and lead 76ers in t
, and then, vote on that basis. host: had a thing florida will go over all? caller: overall it is one to go for romney. the polls are showing a couple point advantage to mitt romney. nelson, the democrat is ahead of mack, but we are all voting for mack and help him. host: wisconsin, on our line for independents. caller: appalling about the woman from wisconsin, my state about the woman from a woma from wisconsin. they say the debt is being rolled over. he is not fiscally responsible. he was nicknamed taxing it tummy when he was here -- taxing tommy. he is not fiscally responsible. and i am voting for tammy and i do not even like her, just because of that. host: why not? caller: i never have. i am an independent, i always thought she was too much of a liberal for me. i remember tommy thompson as governor. there's no way of would vote for him. tammy baldwin is not in my district. i have never voted for her before. but i am now. host: as far as ads and calls, what has that been like? caller: i hang up on all of the phone calls. i am tired of them. i hate it. there's nothing i can do about that
from florida. democrat line. good morning. >> good morning. yes. i'll say instead of cutting entitlements like social security or medicaid. with social security, it's one of those things that they've taken money from so why should they cut social security and again when you think about it. we have 51 states. how come we have 437 something people representing 51 states? i think we should cut down the congress before anything else, and then we start on the our stuff. thank you. >> thanks for the call. john in north carolina twitter saying running surplus like every ponzi scheme does at first. political note from the "new york times". former aid to winning a full term after winning a special election. this is a photograph of former congresswoman giffords and later resigned to win on to win the special election back in june and he defeated his republican opponent. who was a retired air force colonel by a margin of 1402 votes. election was declared bow razor thin victory over district in arizona that will remain in democratic hands. take a look at 1935. franklind roosevelt part of
that is a good thing. the people in ohio, virginia, florida, nevada -- they took this election enormously seriously, understood the unique role they had to play. voters in battleground states understand they have a unique role a lot of us the citizens united to enjoy because they are not and state that will determine the president. >> the super pac's dynamic this time was obviously new and unprecedented. you had senate candidates -- sherrod brown in ohio had $40 million spent against him by super pac's. we had in the last week of our campaign $100 million spent against the president. that is more than the mccain campaign spent in its entirety. remarkable thing. a lot of senate candidates still one. but in house races it had an impact. barack obama, sherrod brown, governors -- they have definition. the spending is a little less nefarious. it's still tough to deal with, but you are not somebody who is now and then somebody drops $4 million on your head will have an impact. we have never seen spending like this. there is a term in politics called gross rating points, the amount of television
that on various platforms. now, coming up, a look at house races, a debate in the florida 18th congressional district with for the republican congressman allen west and democrat, patrick murphy where representative allen west who currently represents the 22nd district, is now running for the 18th house district. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> democrat patrick murphy, republican allen west, the square off in a one-hour debate. >> this is a newschannel 5 special presentation. >> good evening, and welcome to the debate between our candidates tonight. they are democrat patrick murphy and republican allen west. thank you for joining us. i will be the moderator. as part of our coverage, joining me to ask questions are two of my colleagues. our format is simple. each will be asked a question and they will have one minute to respond. then a 30-second rebuttal. at the end of the broadcast, they will each have one minute to make closing statements. we will try to get through a lot of topics. the first question will go
for the popular vote in the national vote happened for ohio and florida, so the lgbt support for obama is bigger and ohio and florida and his winning margin. you can credibly argue that that vote mattered a lot, and if you think about an election where obama loses, ohio and florida, you think about a different election. then i looked at what if romney and obama had more or less split? quite frankly, it has been about that since clinton, roughly 3-1. that is the highest it has been, but quite frankly it has been high all through. what if they split it, more or less evenly, or romney got a little bit more? if romney had won 51%, they would have one of ohio, florida, and virginia. he would have been within four electoral votes of the president. and ohio and florida, all he had to do was win a little over 1/3 of the lgbt vote to win. while i do not think that suggests that suddenly in the way be are now talking about like immigration and things that republicans have to rethink their strategy, i do not think it is quite that level of impact, but a little bit of movement in oflgbt vote in key states,
turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the first time infer florida. you saw young voters actually exceeding in most states their turnout from four years ago to the surprise of most analyst. you saw african turn out even though the excitement was four years ago, you saw a real determination there to support the president and you saw african-american rise in a lot of places. that is getting a lot of attention as it should. you have to understand electorate to understand presidential politics. but the president carried most of the key swush suburban counties t. states that are the four heaviest in white population the president won all four of them. so it may be convenient to say we drove good turnout in the latino and african-american community but it's more complex because the president won swing suburban voters and women voters all over the country. presidential campaigns are complicated t. pursuit of 270 electoral votes is complicated. how we won 332 is complicated. it's not just one thing and we'll talk a lot about what that means for politics going forward. one thing i've learn
carolina was the only battleground state that romney won. >> that is correct. florida is still out. this year is turned out to be irrelevant. what did the republicans miss? >> practically anybody who was brown or black, procter we anybody who believes that immigration is an issue that needs to be tackled. was a case where the republican party is stampeding towards prevalence if they don't catch -- stampeding toward irrelevance up to then't catch new america and the changing demographics. you cannot have a ruling coalition that is virtually all white. you had president obama put together this new rising coalition and put together enough of the old democratic coalition to win. he got more than 70% of hispanics. young voters. if you vote once to twice as a democrat, history shows that there will be a lifetime democrats. the republicans are missing the idea of trying to expand their percentage of a shrinking electorate. this is becoming a majority- minority nation. this is probably the last time the republicans love a chance to win like this. >> let's talk about why this happened. how
jobs. she is a great congresswoman from florida. she is a mother, never an easy job, and she has decided yes when asked to be the share of -- the chair of our party at the national democratic committee, and never an easy job. she has done an incredible job, and i just want you to think about what she has done at the helm of our great party. not only does she ensure the reelection of barack obama, but she did it by making sure there was a constant conversation about what women were facing in which their health care and their lives every day, making sure everyone in this country knew what was at stake. i think she will deliver florida, which is pretty impressive. she has been an incredible leader, and someone to look at, and we really do see her as a role model, so we hope even though i knew she has three major jobs, and i know they are very much hoping she keeps all three jobs, because we cannot imagine seeing the next two years where we still have to fight to get a house back. we have one more thing we need to do. having debby wasserman schulz will help us get there. thank you so
-lehtinen, for so much time as she may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentlewoman from florida is recognized for such time she may consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the gentleman from indiana for the time. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now w
, florida, on the democratic line. go ahead. caller: i want to speak on the fiscal cliff. who controls the fiscal cliff? is it congress? host: there are ongoing negotiations over the various fiscal policies that need to be changed between congress and the white house, burt congress makes -- but congress is the one who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile ca
with us. thank you for your support. my name is patrick murphy from florida district 18. the youngest member of congress. i did defeatists someone you may know -- a guy named alan west. with the help of a lot of people behind me. thank you for your support. throughout this campaign the one message i heard was the need for bipartisanship to reach across the aisle. that is what we need to do. we have to put our country first. what i talked about with my colleagues is problem solvers, doing what is best for americans. to what is best for all americans. that is what we will do. that is what our country needs. that is what i plan on doing. thank you all very much. i appreciate it. >> without further ado, still working in to whatever comes next, the great chairman of the democratic congressional trepang committee. a leader in the congress while he was going to the work he was doing. he had to meet the needs. he did faithfully in first of his constituents who were under siege from hurricane sandy. he has his priorities in order. he knows his policy. he loves his american people. he is very p
in the code. that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business and i was telling us how we're going to raise hens and produce eggs. that is an important piece that has been a fight in this campaign, that has not had it not apply, but that is something we have to have in the farm bill, and that is what i want to get into conference by the end of the year. >> i hope if the farm bill comes to the floor is an open roll, the amendment process can take place. i expect the conservatives to -- i do not know if we have the votes for it -- but at least we will start that the debate, separating the food stamp provisions from the other policies. since i am surrounded by other states, the other gentleman would like to speak as well. >> speaking as one who campaign in support of the house bill, without apology, i can tell you the farmers of north dakota like the house bill just fine, and not only did they have an objection to $16 billion more in cuts to a program that has grown 50% in the last four years, it only amounts to a 2% cut in the food stamp program, they l
not to be doing anything new. if you look back, 1961, the court decided a case. hoyt v. florida. she was what we would call a battered woman. one day, her philandering husband had humiliated her to the breaking point. she spied her son's baseball bats in the corner of the room. with all her might, she brought it down on her husband head. he fell to the floor and that was the end of the argument, at the end of the husband, and the beginning of the murder prosecution. so gwendolyn hoyt thought, if there were women on the jury, they might better understand her state of mind. even if they did not acquit her of the murder charge, they might come in with a verdict of manslaughter. she was convicted of murder by an all-male jury. when the case came to the supreme course, we do not understand what this complaint is about. women have the best of all possible worlds. they're not on the jury rolls, but if they want to serve, they can for the asking. think of how many men would sign up if they did not have to. she was told this and was dumbfounded. they did not understand her plight. this was in 1961. the l
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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